HTTPS in DaCHS

Browser windows with and without HTTPS.
Another little aspect of HTTPS support in DaCHS: In the web interface, the webSAMP button must disappear in pages served through HTTPS: it simply wouldn’t work.

(Warning: No astronomy-relevant content at all this time).

I can’t say I’m a big fan of the mighty push towards HTTPS that’s going on right now – as I’m arguing in the updated operator’s guide it doesn’t do people’s privacy a lot of good (compared to, say, pushing for browsers to not execute Javascript by default or have DNSSEC widely deployed), but it’s a fairly substantial operational liability. With HTTPS, operators have to deal with cryptographic material, regularly update their certificates, restart their services in time and assemble the whole thing correctly (don’t get me started about proxying, SNI, and all those horrors). Users, on the other hand, have to keep their CA certificates in order, in particular when they do programmatic VO access, where the browser vendors, their employers and who knows who else doesn’t do it for them. Pop quiz: How would you install a new CA certificate on your box? And will your default browser see it?

But on the other hand, there are some scenarios in which HTTPS makes sense, and I can remotely fantasise that some of those may even be relevant to the VO. And people have been asking for HTTPS in DaCHS a number of times, at times even because their administrations urged them to switch. So, here it is, hopefully. Turning it on is reasonably easy when you use Letsencrypt (which in particular entails having ports 80 and 443); the section on Letencrypt in the operator’s guide tells what to do. In particular don’t forget the cron job, because without it, things would break after three months (when the initial certificate expires).

Things get difficult after that. For one, if your box is known under several names (our data center, for instance, can be reached as any of dc.g-vo.org, vo.uni-hd.de, and dc.zah.uni-heidelberg.de; this of course also includes things like www.example.org and example.org), you’ll now have to tell DaCHS about it in the new [web]alternateHostnames configuration item; for instance, we have

[web]
serverURL: http://dc.zah.uni-heidelberg.de
alternateHostnames:dc.g-vo.org, vo.uni-hd.de

in our /etc/gavo.rc.

And then the Registry has to know you have https. There’s actually no convention for that in the VO yet. But since I’d really like to have at least fallback interfaces with plain HTTP, we’ll have to come up with something. For now, my plan is to have the alternative protocol (i.e., HTTPS for sites that have an HTTP-serverURL and vice versa) using the brand-new VOResource 1.1 mirrorURLs (in RegTAP 1.1, they are in the mirror_url column rr.interface). To make DaCHS declare the alternate URLs, set [web]registerAlternative to True.

Another change I’ve introduced for HTTPS is that the default HTML template for the form renderer (i.e., the one people use who come with a browser) now suppresses the SAMP button if the request came in through HTTPS; that’s because WebSAMP doesn’t work with HTTPS and probably never will – at least I can’t see a way to make it happen without totally wrecking what security guarantees HTTPS gives.

All this doesn’t yet cater for the case when you use a reverse proxy to terminate HTTPS. If you are in that situation, please talk to me so we can figure out a sane way for you explain to DaCHS what to tell the Registry.

Anyway, if you want to try things out, just switch to the beta repostitory and upgrade. Feedback is highly welcome.

Oh, and if you’re a client developer: Our data center is now reachable through HTTPS (at https://dc.g-vo.org), and we already have pushed the records with mirrorURLs declaring HTTPS support to the RegTAP service at dc.g-vo.org (the others will have to wait a bit longer, as we haven’t re-published our registry records yet (it’s all experimental, after all).

Space and Time not lost on the Registry

Histogram: observation dates of an image service

A histogram of times for which the Palomar-Leiden service has images: That’s temporal service coverage right there.

If you are an astronomer and you’ve ever tried looking for data in the Virtual Observatory Registry, chances are you have wondered “Why can’t I enter my position here?” Or perhaps “So, I’m looking for images in [NIII] – where would I go?”

Both of these are examples for the use of Space-Time Coordinates (STC) in data discovery – yes, spectral coordinates count as STC, too, and I could make an argument for it. But this post is about something else: None of this has worked in the Registry up to now.

It’s time to mend this blatant omission. To take the next steps, after a bit of discussion on some of the IVOA’s mailing lists, I have posted an IVOA note proposing exactly those last Thursday. It is, perhaps with a bit of over-confidence, called A Roadmap for Space-Time Discovery in the VO Registry. And I’d much appreciate feedback, in particular if you are a VO user and have ideas on what you’d like to do with such a facility.

In this post, I’d like to give a very quick run-down on what is in it for (1) VO users, (2) service operators in general, and (3) service operators who happen to run DaCHS.

First, users. We already are pretty good on spatial coverage (for about 13000 of almost 20000 resources), so it might be worth experimenting with that. For now, the corresponding table is only available on the RegTAP mirror at http://dc.g-vo.org/tap. There, you can try queries like

select ivoid from
rr.table_column
natural join rr.stc_spatial
where
  1=contains(gavo_simbadpoint('HDF'), coverage)
  and ucd like 'phot.flux;em.radio%'

to find – in this case – services that have radio fluxes in the area of the Hubble Deep Field. If these lines scare you or you don’t know what to do with the stupid ivoids, check the previous post on this blog – it explains a bit more about RegTAP and why you might care.

Similarly cool things will, hopefully, some day be possible in spectrum and time. For instance, if you were interested in SII fluxes in the crab nebula in the early sixties, you could, some day, write

SELECT ivoid FROM
rr.stc_temporal
NATURAL JOIN rr.stc_spectral
NATURAL JOIN rr.stc_spatial
WHERE
  1=CONTAINS(gavo_simbadpoint('M1'), coverage)
  AND 1=ivo_interval_overlaps(
    6.69e-7, 6.75e-7, 
    wavelength_start, wavelength_end)
  AND 1=ivo_interval_overlaps(
    36900, 38800,
    time_start, time_end)

As you can see, the spectral coordiate will, following (admittedly broken) VO convention, be given in meters of vacuum wavelength, and time in MJD. In particular the thing with the wavelength isn’t quite settled yet – personally, I’d much rather have energy there. For one, it’s independent of the embedding medium, but much more excitingly, it even remains somewhat sensible when you go to non-electromagnetic messengers.

A pattern I’m trying to establish is the use of the user-defined function ivo_interval_overlaps, also defined in the Note. This is intended to allow robust query patterns in the presence of two intrinsically interval-valued things: The service’s coverage and the part of the spectrum you’re interested in, say. With the proposed pattern, either of these can degenerate to a single point and things still work. Things only break when both the service and you figure that “Aw, Hα is just 656.3 nm” and one of you omits a digit or adds one.

But that’s academic at this point, because really few resources define their coverage in time and and spectrum. Try it yourself:

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (
  SELECT DISTINCT ivoid FROM rr.stc_temporal) AS q

(the subquery with the DISTINCT is necessary because a single resource can have multiple rows for time and spectrum when there’s multiple distinct intervals – think observation campaigns). If this gives you more than a few dozen rows when you read this, I strongly suspect it’s no longer 2018.

To improve this situation, the service operators need to provide the information on the coverage in their resource records. Indeed, the registry schemas already have the notion of a coverage, and the Note, in its core, simply proposes to add three elements to the coverage element of VODataService 1.1. Two of these new elements – the coverage in time and space – are simple floating-point intervals and can be repeated in order to allow non-contiguous coverage. The third element, the spatial coverage, uses a nifty data structure called a MOC, which expands to “HEALPix Multi-Order Coverage map” and is the main reason why I claim we can now pull off STC in the Registry: MOCs let databases and other programs easily and quickly manipulate areas on the sphere. Without MOCs, that’s a pain.

So, if you have registry records somewhere, please add the elements as soon as you can – if you don’t know how to make a MOC: CDS’ Aladin is there to help. In the end, your coverage elements should look somewhat like this:

<coverage>
  <spatial>3/336,338,450-451,651-652,659,662-663 
    4/1816,1818-1819,1822-1823,1829,1840-1841</spatial>
  <temporal>37190 37250</temporal>
  <temporal>54776 54802</temporal>
  <spectral>3.3e-07 6.6e-07</spectral>
  <spectral>2.0e-05 3.5e-06</spectral>
  <waveband>Optical</waveband>
  <waveband>Infrared</waveband>
</coverage>

The waveband elements are remainders from VODataService 1.1. They are still in use (prominently, for one, in SPLAT), and it’s certainly still a good idea to keep giving them for the forseeable future. You can also see how you would represent multiple observing campaigns and different spectral ranges.

Finally, if you’re running DaCHS and you’re using it to generate registry records (and there’s almost no excuse for not doing so), you can simply write a coverage element into your RD starting with DaCHS 1.2 (or, if you run betas, 1.1.1, which is already available). You’ll find lots of examples at the usual place. As a relatively interesting example, the resource descriptor of plts. It has this:


  <updater spaceTable="data" spectralTable="data" mocOrder="4"/>
  <spectral>3.3e-07 6.6e-07</spectral>
  <temporal>37190 37250</temporal>
  <temporal>38776 38802</temporal>
  <temporal>41022 41107</temporal>
  <temporal>41387 41409</temporal>
  <temporal>41936 41979</temporal>
  <temporal>43416 43454</temporal>
  <spatial>3/282,410 4/40,323,326,329,332,387,390,396,648-650,1083,1085,1087,1101-1103,1123,1125,1132-1134,1136,1138-1139,1144,1146-1147,1173-1175,1216-1217,1220,1223,1229,1231,1235-1236,1238,1240,1597,1599,1614,1634,1636,1728,1730,1737,1739-1740,1765-1766,1784,1786,2803,2807,2809,2812</spatial>
</coverage>

This particular service archives plate scans from the Palomar-Leiden Trojan surveys; these were looking for Trojan asteroids (of Jupiter) using the Palomar 122 cm Schmidt and were conducted in several shortish campaigns between 1960 and 1977 (incidentally, if you’re looking for things near the Ecliptic, this stuff might still hold valuable insights for you). Because the fill factor for the whole time period is rather small, I manually extracted the time coverage; for that, I ran select dateobs from plts.data via TAP and made the histogram plot above. Zooming in a bit, I read off the limits in TOPCAT’s coordinate display.

The other coverages, however, were put in automatically by DaCHS. That’s what the updater element does: for each axis, you can say where DaCHS should look, and it will then fill in the appropriate data from what it guesses gives the relevant coordiantes – that’s straightforward for standard tables like the ones behind SSAP and SIAP services (or obscore tables, for that matter), perhaps a bit more involved otherwise. To say “just do it for all axis”, give the updater a single sourceTable attribute.

Finally, in this case I’m overriding mocOrder, the order down to which DaCHS tries to resolve spatial features. I’m doing this here because in determining the coverage of image services DaCHS right now only considers the centers of the images, and that’s severely underestimating the coverage here, where the data products are the beautiful large Schmidt plates. Hence, I’m lowering the resolution from the default 6 (about one degree linearly) to still give some approximation to the actual data coverage. We’ll fix the underlying deficit as soon as pgsphere, the postgres extension which is actually dealing with all the MOCs, has support for turning circles and polygons into MOCs.

When you have defined an updater, just run dachs limits q.rd, and DaCHS will carefully (preserving your indentation) re-write the RD to contain what DaCHS has worked out from your table (but careful: it will overwrite what was previously there; so, make sure you only ask DaCHS to only deal with axes you’re not dealing with manually).

If you feel like writing code discovering holes in the intervals, ideally already in the database: that would be great, because the tighter the intervals defined, the fewer false positives people will have in data discovery.

The take-away for DaCHS operators is:

  1. Add STC coverage to your resources as soon as you’ve updated to DaCHS 1.2
  2. If you don’t have to have the tightest coverage declaration conceivable, all you have to do to have that is add
      <coverage>
        <updater sourceTable="my_table"/>
      </coverage>

    to your RD (where my_table is the id of your service’s “main” table) and then run dachs limits q.rd

  3. For special effects and further information, see Coverage Metadata in the DaCHS reference documentation
  4. If you have a nice postgres function that splits a simple coverage interval up so the filling factor of a set of new intervals increases (or know a nice, database-compatible algorithm to do so) – please let me know.

Heidelberg Data Center Down^WUp again

Well, it has happened – perhaps it was the strain of restoring a couple of terabyte of data (as reported yesterday), perhaps it’s uncorrelated, but our main database server’s RAID threw errors and then disappeared from the SCSI bus today at about 15:03 UTC.

This means that all services from http://dc.g-vo.org are broken for the moment. We’re sorry, and we will try to at least limp on as fast as possible.

Update (2017-11-13, 14:30 UTC): Well, it’s official. What’s broken is the lousy Adaptec controller – whatever configuration we tried, it can’t talk to its backplane any more. Worse, we don’t have a spare part for that piece here. We’re trying to get one as quickly as possible, but even medium-sized shops don’t have multi-channel SAS controllers in stock, so it’ll have to be express mail.

Of course, the results of the weekend’s restore are lost; so, we’ll need about 24 hours of restore again to get up to 90% of the services after the box is back up, with large tables being restored after that. Again, we’re unhappy about the long downtime, but it could only have been averted by having a hot spare, which for this kind of infrastructure just wouldn’t have been justifiable over the last ten years.

Another lesson learned: Hardware RAID sucks. It was really hard to analyse the failure, and the messages of the controller BIOS were completely unhelpful. We, at least, will migrate to JBOD (one of the cool IT acronyms with a laid-back expansion: Just a Bunch Of Disks) and software RAID.

And you know what? At least the box had two power supplies. If these weren’t redundant, you bet the power supply would have failed.

To give you an idea how bad things are, here is the open server with the controller card that probably caused the mayhem (left), and 12 TB of fast disk, yearning for action (right).

[A database server in pieces]

Update (2017-11-14, 12:21 UTC): We’re cursed. The UPS guys with the new controller were in the main institute building. They claimed they couldn’t find anyone. Ok, our janitor is on sick leave, and it was lunch break, but still. It can’t be that hard to see walk up a single flight of steps. Do we really have to wait another day?

Update (2017-11-14, 14:19 UTC): Well, UPS must have read this – or the original delivery report was bogus. Anyway, not an hour after the last entry the delivery status changed to “delivered”, and there the thing was in our mailbox.

Except – it wasn’t the controller in the first place. It turned out that, in fact, four disks had failed at the same time. It’s hard to believe but that’s what it is. Seems we’ll have to step carefully until the disks are replaced. We’ll run a thorough check tonight while we prepare the database tables.

Unless more disaster strikes, we should be back by tomorrow morning CET – but without the big tables, and I’m not sure yet whether I dare putting them in on these flimsy, enterprise-class, 15k, SAS disks. Well, I give you they’ve run for five years now.

Update (2017-11-15, 14:37 UTC): After a bit more consideration, I figured I wouldn’t trust the aging enterprise disks any more. Our admins then gave me a virtual machine on one of their boxes that should be powerful enough to keep the data center afloat for a while. So, the data center is back up at 90% (counting by the number of regression tests still failing) since an hour ago or so.

Again, the big tables are missing (and a few obscure services the RDs of which showed bitrot and need polishing); they should come in over the next days, one by one; provided the VM isn’t much slower than our DB server, you should see about two of them come in per day, with my planned sequence being hsoy, ppmxl, gps1, gaia, 2mass, sdssdr7, urat1, wise, ucac5, ucac4, rosat, ucac3, mwsc, mwsc-e14a, usnob, supercosmos.

Feel free to vote tables up if you severely miss a table.

And all this assumes no further disaster strikes…

Update (2017-11-16, 9:22 UTC): Well, it ain’t pretty. The first large catalog, HSOY, is finally in, and the CLUSTER operation ((which dominates restore time) took almost 12 hours; and HSOY, at 0.5 Gigarecord, isn’t all that large. So, our replacement machine really is a good deal slower than our normal database server that did that operation in less than three hours. I guess you’ll want to do your large-table queries on a different service for the next couple of weeks. Use the Registry!

Update (2017-11-20, 9:05 UTC): With a bit more RAM (DaCHS operators: version 1.1 will have a new configuration item for indexing work memory!), things have been going faster over the weekend. We’re now down to 15 regression tests failing (of 330), with just 4 large catalogs missing still, and then a few nitty-gritty, almost invisible tables still needing some manual work.

Update (2017-11-23, 14:51 UTC): Only 10 regression tests are still failing, but progress has become slow again – the machine has been clustering supercosmos.data for the last 36 hours now; it’s not that huge a table, so it’s a bit hard to understand why this table is holding up things so much. On the plus side, new SSDs for our database server are being shipped, so we should see faster operation soon.

Update (2017-12-01, 13:05 UTC): We’ve just switched back the database server back to our own server with its fresh SSDs. A few esoteric big tables are yet missing, but we’d say the crisis is over. Hence, that’s the last update. Thank you for your attention.

A Tale of CLUSTER and Failure

[Screenshot: aptitude purge '~c']
This command nuked 5 TB of database tables (with a bit of folly before).

Whenever you read “backup”, the phrase “lessons learned” is usually not far off. And so it is here, with a little story for DaCHS operators (food for thought, I’d say), astronomers (knowing what’s going on behind the curtain sometimes helps write better queries), and everyone else (for amusement and a generous helping of schadenfreude).

It all started yesterday when I upgraded the main database server of our data center (most anything in the VO with a org.gavo.dc in the IVOID depends on it) to Debian stretch. When that was done, I decided that with about 1000 installed packages, too much cruft had accumulated and started happily removing unused software. Until I accidentally removed the postgres package. In itself, that would not have been so disastrous – we’re running Debian, which means packages usually keep the configuration and, in particular, the data around even if you remove them. The postgres packages, at the very least, do, and so does DaCHS.

Unless, that is, you purge the postgres package before you notice you’ve
removed it. I, for one, found it appropriate to purge all packages deleted but not purged right after my package deletion spree. Oh bother. Can you imagine my horror when the beastly machine said “dropping cluster main”? And ignored my panic-induced ^C (which, of course, was the right thing to do; the database was toast already anyway).

There I had just flushed 5 Terabytes of highly structured data down the drain.

Well, go restore from backup, you say? As usual with backups, it’s not that simple™. You see, backing up databases is tricky. One can of course just back up the files as they are and then try to restore from them. However, while the database is running, it is continually modifying what’s on the disk, so such a backup will be an inconsistent, unusable mess. Even if one had a file system that can do snapshots, a running server has in-memory state that is typically needed to make heads and tails of the disk image.

So, to back up a database, there are essentially variations of two themes, roughly:

  • ask the database to dump itself. The result is a conventional file that essentially is a recipe for how to re-create a particular state of the database.
  • have a “hot spare”. That’s another machine with a database server running. In one way or another that other box snoops on what the main machine is doing and just replicates the actions it sees. The net effect is that you have an immediately usable copy of your database server.

Anyway, after the opening of this article you’ll not be surprised to learn that we did neither. The hot spare scenario needs a machine powerful enough to usefully serve as a stand-in and to not slow down the main machine when we feed data by the Gigarecords. Running such a machine just for backup would be a major waste of electricity – after all, this is the first time in about 10 years that it would really have been needed, and such a box slurps juice like it’s… well, juice.

As to maintaining a dump: Well, for the big catalogs, we use DaCHS’ direct grammars [PSA: don’t follow this link unless you’re running DaCHS]. These are, except perhaps for a small factor, just as fast as a restore from a dump. And the indices (i.e., data structures that tell the computer where to look for objects with a certain position or magnitude rather than having to go through the whole table) need to be re-made when restoring from dumps, too, so we’d be pushing around files of several terabyte for almost no benefit.

Except. Except I could have known better, because during catalog ingestions the most time-consuming task usually is the CLUSTER operation. That’s when the machine re-organises the data on disk so it matches expected access patterns – for astronomical data, that’s usually by spatial location. Having a large table clustered makes an astonishing difference, in particular when you’re still using spinning disks (as we are). So, there’s really no way around it.

But it takes time. And more time. And that time is saved when restoring from a dump, because the dump (hopefully) largely preserves the on-disk organisation, and so the CLUSTER is almost a no-op.

Well, the bottom line is: on our Heidelberg data center, the big tables are only coming back slowly; as I write this, from the gigarecord league PPMXL and GPS1 are back, with SDSS DR7 and HSOY expected later today. But it’ll probably take until late next week until all the big tables are back in and properly indexed and clustered.

Apologies for any inconvenience. On the other hand, as measured by our regression tests (DaCHS operators: required reading!) 90% of our stuff is fine again, so we could fare worse given we just had a database disaster of magnitude 5 on the Terabyte scale.

Which begs the question: Was it better this way? At least many important services are safely back up, and that might very well not be the case were we running the restore from an actual dump. Hm.