Artikel mit Tag Debian:

  • Migrating Away From Wordpress

    Since 2016, this blog was served through a Wordpress instance at the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam AIP – thanks again to our colleagues there for maintaining the platform over all these years.

    But since it now seems as if this is something that might last a long time (by Web standards), we have decided that we should leave PHP behind and look for something properly version controllable, and something that can simply live somewhere on a web server with essentially zero maintenance. Hence, we have moved the content to pelican – which has a clean Debian package, is written in Python, and does not need any active components of its own.

    As an extra bonus, the blog posts are now authored in ReStructuredText, which happens to be what DaCHS' documentation is written in, and what you can use to author metadata for DaCHS resources. If you want, you can now check out the source code for the articles (sorry, it's still subversion; one of these days I'll find something fancier than naked git but lighter than gitlab, and then I'll move GAVO's VCS to git).

    As expected, porting the theme (which I only did rather half-heartedly, so things are a bit less pretty now) and getting the figures right was what caused the bulk of the work. On the plus side, I have also greatly cleaned up categories and tags. Still, it's quite likely we messed something up. If you find anything broken here, please let us know: https://www.g-vo.org/pmwiki/About/Impressum lists the main ways through which you can reach us.

    With that: Subscribe to our Atom feed!

  • DaCHS 2.3 on the way to Debian main

    DaCHS, Debian, and 2.3

    DaCHS 2.3 will be the first DaCHS officially in Debian.

    DaCHS releases usually come around the Interops in (roughly) May and November. Not this one, though, for one pleasant, one unpleasant, and several other reasons.

    The unpleasant reason first: The 2.2 release has a fairly severe memory leak in it (resulting, in roundabout ways, from python 3 preserving tracebacks of nested exceptions), which of course really became virulent on my server right over the holidays. If you run a site with just a few gigs of RAM that might be hit by second-rate async clients, this will bite you and you ought to upgrade now (well, you ought to upgrade anyway).

    The pleasant reason is that DaCHS has made it into Debian main and thus, unless something disastrous happens, it will be part of the Debian version 11 (“bullseye”). This means that people who do not need to be on the bleeding edge, will not need to monkey around with our repository (and its signing key) any more starting some time in 2021 (or just about now, if they're running testing). I can't tell you how gratifying that feels to me. And well, I wanted relatively recent code corresponding to a something on our release branch in bullseye.

    One of the other reasons is that stilts' author Mark Taylor is trying to stomp out TAP services failing his taplint's validation, and many DaCHS 2.2 services (those that don't define TAP examples, which of course is a shame anyway) fail with only the (really minor) error E-EXDH-1 (see below).

    DaCHS 2.3 has some other noteworthy changes; as usual in minor version steps, my expectation is that none of this will break existing services. Still, you may want to glance over the following list, as there are some behavioural changes nevertheless. In approximate order of the wizardry involved:

    • I've long had a bad consciousness because DaCHS has stored cleartext passwords so far. That's probably not a problem for DaCHS itself (as it does not protect great riches), but people tend to re-use passwords, and I'd have hated to leak passwords that might work elsewhere. Well, no longer: the dc.users table now contains hashed passwords, and the upgrade will hash them. This, in particular, means that you cannot recover them once you have updated (which, of course, is as it should be).

    • The javascript delivered with DaCHS was no longer quite up to date with Debian's jquery. I have updated it in several ways, and I have restored the functionality of the WebSAMP button in the default response. If you have custom HTML templates containing javascript, you may need to update them to newer jquery, too, specifically,

      • change .unload( to .on("unload", (this happens in the SAMP code in defaultresponse.html, for instance).
      • also in the SAMP code in overridden defaultresponses, change the icon URL to completeURL("/logo_tiny.png") (or whatever) to avoid trouble with https installations.
      • if you compare jquery element names: these are now returned in lower case.

      And yes, WebSAMP now mostly works with HTTPS (which is unrelated to this update, except that DaCHS until 2.2 suppresses the WebSAMP button when it thinks it is delivering through HTTPS).

    • DaCHS now honours upgrade-insecure-requests headers that common web browsers issue and will then redirect them to https when appropriate. So, please don't forcibly do these redirects any more from reverse proxies – they break, among other things, TAP, and they're generally just a bad idea.

    • DaCHS now instructs the database to return all bits of floating point numbers. This may break your regression tests, but it's the right thing to do (blog post on this).

    • Another thing that may break regression tests: TAP results now have column names in the case given in the RD (where previously they were lowercased unless quoted). Let me cite rule 1 of SQL table design: Don't use mixed-case column names.

    • Wildcards in the directory parts of sources patterns are now expanded, which means that you can write things like <sources pattern="data/202?/*.fits"/>, which previously wouldn't have done what you might reasonably expect; however, this might in rare cases match additional sources when you re-import data.

    • The examples endpoint now returns a 404 if no examples are defined on a service; this fixes the stilts taplint E-EXA-EXDH-1 error I mentioned above.

    • DaCHS will now refuse to use x-unregistred as an authority when publishing resources or creating publisher DIDs. This is to protect to people who do a lot of imports before settling on their authority; sometimes DaCHS' fallback null authority got into their databases, which then caused quite a bit of cleanup effort.

    • Because of licensing problems, the Debian package no longer contains the CC logos for the time being. If you want them back, drop appropriate files cc0.png, ccby.png, and ccybysa.png into /var/gavo/web/nv_static/img

    • You can now list modules you want in a procedure application in its setup/@imports attribute. I've done this after I had to add code to a proc's setup just to run an import once too often.

    • simbadinterface's Sesame now uses the dc.metastore table to cache results rather than files as before. Previous saveNew, id, and debug parameters are no longer supported (the base.caches.getSesame interface is unchanged, so it's unlikely you'd notice this).

    • table.query() or querier.query() are now seriously deprecated (you may have used them in code embedded in RDs). See Database Queries in the reference documentation for what the recommended query patterns are (and have been for a while). Just one word of warning: table.query would macro-expand its argument, which the connection method obviously cannot. If you depend on that, call table.expand(query) manually first.

    With this: Merry upgrading and a happy new year!

  • DaCHS is Bustered

    DaCHS is developed on Debian, and Debian is the recommended deployment platform. Hence, a new major release of Debian (where major means for them: We may break stuff) is always a big thing for me. And so it was with the release that came in July, codenamed “buster”. Both on the “big thing” and on the “break” counts. This posting gives DaCHS deployers some background for their buster upgrades. Astronomers not running Debian themselves won't risk missing anything if they skip this post.

    So, after I upgraded the first thing I noticed is that DaCHS would no longer even start because astropy (which it needs, in particular, because that's where pyfits sits these days) was gone. Simple explanation: Upstream astropy doesn't support python2 any more, and so Debian buster only has python3-astropy.

    Moving DaCHS to python3, unfortunately, isn't that easy; a major dependency, nevow (essentially, a web framework), isn't ported yet, and porting it is a major thing. Believe me, I've tried. The nasty thing, in particular, is that twisted, which lies below nevow still, hands up lots of byte strings. And in python3, b"a"!="a". You wouldn't believe how many interesting bugs that simple truth introduces when you got a library that handed out “just strings” in python2 and now byte strings in python3. Yikes.

    Update (2019-08-28): After quite a bit of experimentation, I finally gave up on providing a python2 version of astropy through release, because for a complicated set of reasons (including numpy declaring a conflict with existing astropys in buster) it is impossible to provide a package that works in buster and doesn't break stretch. So, for buster only you'll have to have a second (or, if running beta, third) gavo line in your sources.list (or equivalent):

    deb http://vo.ari.uni-heidelberg.de/debian buster-foreports main
    

    The instructions at our APT repository have been updated, so you won't have to bookmark this particular page.

    But that wasn't the end of it. Buster comes with Postgres 11, which I look forward to in particular because it supports parallel query execution. That could help us quite a bit, given out large catalogs that quite often we want to run sequential scans on. But of course this means upgrading postgres. And attempting to do that on my development machine immediately hit a wall. What's nice is that the q3c and pgsphere extensions that we've had to push out ourselves so far are now part of Debian main. What's rather fatal is that our pgsphere extensions dealing with HEALPixes and MOCs aren't part of the buster pgsphere package (the reasons for that are tedious and arcane and have to do with OpenSSL and the GPL).

    Also, the pgsphere package coming with buster is called postgres-pgsphere, which is rather unfortunate as it's missing the version indication. So: If you find it on your system, remove it right away. It will conflict with the one true pgsphere package (postgresql-11-pgsphere). That one you'll get from us, and it has the HEALPix stuff built in. TL;DR: run apt install postgresql-q3c postgresql-11-pgsphere before following the postgres update recipe linked above.

    There's a bit more to upgrading the database this time. Because of fairly low-level cleanup in Postgres itself. you're risking index corruption on string indices. Realistically, for almost anything you'll have, it's unlikely that you're affected (it's essentially about non-ASCII in strings), but then it's better to be safe than sorry, and hence you should say:

    reindex database gavo
    

    first thing after you've upgraded to Postgres 11 (which you should really do once the box is on buster). Only if you have very large tables it might be worth it to restrict the index regeneration to indices that could actually need it; see the postgres link above for how to do that.

    One last thing on Postgres upgrades: I've not quite tried to work out why, but probably depending on your /etc/hosts DaCHS on buster is much more likely to connect to your database using IPv6 than it was before. Many older Postgres configurations won't let you in then. If that happens to you, just edit /etc/postgresql/11/main/pg_hba.conf and add a line:

    host    all         all         ::1/32          md5
    

    (or something less permissive if you prefer).

    The next buster-related shock was when TOPCAT's TAP uploads stopped working while my regression tests didn't find anything wrong. After a bit of cursing I eventually figured out that that's not actually buster's fault but twisted's, which in a commit from May 2018 broke chunked uploads (essentially, that's when you're not saying up front how large your upload will be). I've filed a bug report on twisted, but we can't really wait until any sort of fix will be ready and have a broken TOPCAT-DaCHS relationship until then, so for now we're also shipping a fixed twisted package. If you're running DaCHS without our repository enabled, you will have to patch your the twisted code itself. The bug report tells what to do (no warranties, though, because I'm not entriely sure why they changed it in the first place; it's a very small change, though).

    [Update (2019-08-14) scratch the part with the fixed twisted packages. They're too much trouble on stretch systems. You can keep using them on buster boxes if you want, though. The most recent stable release monkeypatches the problem out of presumably broken twisteds, and so will the next beta.]

    I hope you're not totally discouraged now, because upgrade you should (though perhaps not right before going on vacation) – distribution upgrades are unavoidable if you want to run services for decades, and that's definitely a goal within the VO. See the Debian release note for Debian's take on dist upgrades, which arguably is a bit more alarmist than it would need to; a lean, server-only system typically is really simple to upgrade.

    Given the relatively large number of Debian packages we override in buster, I'll be particularly grateful if you complain early about breakage you observe (ideally use the dachs-support mailing list, but see Support for alternatives), and as usual you are encouraged to try the upgrade first on a development system if you have one. Which you should.

  • DaCHS 1.0 released

    Today, I have released DaCHS 1.0 – after long years in the 0.9 range, it was finally time to do so. The jump in the major version number was an opportunity to remove some cruft that had accumulated over the years; this, on the other hand, means that if you're running DaCHS, you should watch the upgrade and see if anything broke later (this might be the perfect time to add regression tests to your RDs).

    The changelog is below, but before that a bold-faced warning:

    Install python-astropy before upgrading

    This is because DaCHS now depends on astropy rather than pyfits and pywcs. The latter is no longer part of Debian stretch, and so we made the jump to astropy (that would have been due during Debian stretch's lifetime anyway) even before 1.0.

    Now, Debian holds back packages with new dependencies, and due to the way DaCHS' modules are distributed, DaCHS will break when some of its packages are held back. The symptom is error messages like "pkg_resources.DistributionNotFound: gavodachs==0.9.8". If you already see those, a apt-get dist-upgrade should get you in business again.

    With this out of the way, here is an annotated log of the major changes:

    • DaCHS' main entry point is now actually called dachs (i.e., call dachs imp q and such in the future). gavo will work as an alias for quite a while to come, though, and it's still used a lot in the documentation (you're welcome to fix this: the docs are maintained on github).
    • Hopefully more useful manpage (of course, also available with man dachs) – have a peek!
    • UWS support is now at version 1.1 (i.e., there's creationDate in jobs, filters in the joblist, and slow polling).
    • Added “declarative” licenses. Please read the Licensing chapter in the tutorial and slap licenses on your data.
    • Now using astropy.wcs instead of pywcs, and astropy.io.fits instead of pyfits. The respective APIs have, unfortunately, changed quite a bit. If you're using them (e.g., in processors), you'll have to change your code; it's unlikely services are impacted at runtime. (see also How do I update my code?).
    • Removed the //epntap#table-2_0mixin. Use
      //epntap2#table-2_0 instead (sorry).
    • Removed sdmCore (use Datalink/SODA instead); the SODA procs in //datalink are also gone, use the ones from //soda instead (sorry, SODA development has been difficult on the IVOA level).
    • Removed imp -u flag and the corresponding updateMode parse option. If you used that or the uploadCore, just mark the DDs involved with updating="True" instead.
    • Massive sanitation of input parameter processing. If you've been using inputTable, inputDD, or have been doing creative things with inputKeys, please check the respective services carefully after upgrading. See also DaCHS' Service Interface in the reference documentation. The most user-visible change in this department is if you've been using repeated parameters to fill array-valued inputs. That's no longer allowed; if you actually must have this kind of thing, you'll need a custom core and must fill the arrays by hand.
    • In DaCHS' SQL interface, tuples now are matched to records and lists to arrays (it was the other way round before). If while importing you manually created tuples to fill to array-like columns, you'll have to make lists from these now.
    • rsc.makeData or rsc.TableForDef no longer automatically make connections when used on database tables. You must give them explicit connection arguments now (with base.getTableConn() as conn:).
    • logo_tiny.png and logo_big.png are now ignored by DaCHS, all logos spit out by it are now based on logo_medium.png, including, if not overridden, the favicon (that you will now get if you have not set it before).
    • Removed (probably largely unused) features editCore, SDM2 support, pkg_resource overrides, simpleView, computedCore.
    • Removed the argparse module shipped with DaCHS. This breaks compatibility with python 2.6 (although you can still run DaCHS with a manually installed argparse.py in 2.6).

    Even though that's quite a mouthful, I expect few people will actually experience breaking services. If you do, by all means let us know on the DaCHS-support mailing list.

    As usual, the general upgrading instructions are available in the operator's guide; if you plan on upgrading to stretch soon, also have a look at hints on postgres upgrades. Stretch comes with postgres 9.6 (jessie: 9.4), and you should migrate sooner or later anyway.

    Users not using Debian's package management can, as usual, grab tarballs from http://soft.g-vo.org/dachs.

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